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— tagged :
 #reblog
 #me

(Source: filthyfawn)

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translugia:

*tips muppet* m’namana

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how fucked up is it that someone made up a story about a child nearly being kidnapped for notes though like this is some “take a picture of a girl attacked by a kangaroo and tell ppl she was raped” bullshit are you guys this desperate to make an innocent little girls’ show look like some kind of pedophile hangout can children enjoy nothing without u ppl ruining it for them that post is disgusting

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— tagged :
 #nonsense

Btw I got don’t starve for the ps4 yesterday and it’s a lot of fun so far! I survived 10 days on my first try before getting murdered by spiders… And then resurrected w two separate touchstones but each time I couldn’t find my home base again where I had my extra stockpile of tools and there was no flint anywhere so I ended up dying come nightfall lol

but I unlocked the firestarter girl as a playable character so I’ll try her next time!

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malformalady:

An eye-catching two-toned lobster called Harley Quinn has become even more striking after moulting to reveal electric blue skin down one side of his body. The sea creature had surprised experts after it was caught in 2010 with a yellow, red and black body, buts its unusual appearance has intensified with each moult and it now has electric blue colouring. The lobster named Harley Quinn is pictured centre, with his two old coats, which have been carefully preserved.

malformalady:

An eye-catching two-toned lobster called Harley Quinn has become even more striking after moulting to reveal electric blue skin down one side of his body. The sea creature had surprised experts after it was caught in 2010 with a yellow, red and black body, buts its unusual appearance has intensified with each moult and it now has electric blue colouring. The lobster named Harley Quinn is pictured centre, with his two old coats, which have been carefully preserved.

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eleanor (a rat) decided she wanted to make friends with chester (a dog) today. chester seemed like he also wanted to make friends with eleanor

the issue is that im afraid chesters idea of being friends might involve things that could hurt a small rodent so when i took eleanor and brigid (also a rat) out today i ended up having to spend most of my time trying to keep them away from each other. like youd think rats would be good at being cautious but eleanor IS NOT jesus christ

the good news is my other dog decided hes afraid of rats so thats not a problem

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— tagged :
 #reblog
 #speaking of which
 #funny

(Source: suckmymara)

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sixpenceee:

tacocat-washere:

sixpenceee:

So this comic, has been mentioned many, many times as one of the most creepiest comics. Read it from right to left. Here it is:X

OH MY GOD

Hey so a lot of people are messaging me about how cool Junji Ito and his horror manga is. Here’s a site for more horror comics made by him

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imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.
Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.
The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.
According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

“We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.
Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.
The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”
At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.
Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.
Source»

imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.

Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.

The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.

According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.

Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.

The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”

At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.

Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.

Source»

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burntlikethesun:

gargoyleofdepp:

I am so fucking sick of everyone calling Moffat a terrible writer. Girl in the Fireplace? Yes that was fucking horrendous. The Empty Child and the Doctor Dances? Ugh the worst. Blink? Silence in the Library? Forest of the Dead? And I don’t give a shit what people say, River and her story line was fucking creative and interesting.

I don’t care how you think of him as a person but you can’t say he can’t fucking write.

image

I’m confused, why is OP saying that Moffat’s episodes are bad and then claiming that other people can’t also not like his writing?

(And I actually disagree in that I loved The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances, tbh. It’s just that the rest of his writing seems to point to that one being a fluke, lol.)

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